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starry_diadem: (StarryDiadem1)

Korōnē

διάδημα: The Glass Hat

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Created on 2009-04-25 21:13:49 (#123807), last updated 2017-04-20 (6 days ago)

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Name:starry_diadem
Birthdate:May 25
Website:Celestial Dome
Me
English, married. WELL over the age of 18 and able to read adult content - c'mon, I write original series Battlestar Galactica slash, for heaven's sake, and not because I got hooked on the re-runs. I also write SGA (John/Rodney) and Lancer gen fic. I will use appropriate alerts on my fic for known triggers and squicks.

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Tiaras

Korōnē means 'the curved beak of the crow', but it also means a 'garland or crown'. Roberto Calasso The Marriage of Cadmus and Harmony

Korōnē, the Greek word for 'curved', is used in this context for any kind of circle or circlet worn on the head to signify a connexion with the gods. This includes the wreath, the crest or horns, as well as the crown, diadem, and tiara." Ruth Amberstone, The Secret Language of Tarot

διάδημα - diadima - diadem



"I've just been to the Tower of London with school, to see the Queen's glass hats."



Tiara journal header :
Gold, silver and diamond tiara, made by Hunt & Roskell
London, England, around 1855

The tiara is formed of three sprays of naturalistic oak leaves and acorns, which can be transformed into a brooch and a pair of comb mounts; the brooch and tiara frame of gold, the combs of tortoiseshell. The jewelled elements are interchangeable between the combs, the brooch-frame and tiara. A certain economy in the wearing of jewels on formal occasions, and changes in dress and hair fashion led to the development of jewellery that could be mounted in a number of different ways. 'Convertible' jewellery rarely survives with all its alternative mounts, making this set especially remarkable.

Mrs Hull Grundy's collection of naturalistic jewellery is the largest and most important of any collection of this type. This example still has its original velvet-lined case. Mrs Hull Grundy understood the importance of these: English jewellery is often unmarked and the known dates of the retailer's and case-maker's operations can help pinpoint the date of jewellery that otherwise could only be placed in a period of several decades (that is, when it was fashionable).

Here the case is labelled 'Hunt & Roskell, 156 New Bond Street', with a Viscount's coronet and monogram 'MP' stamped in gold on the lid (Mary Selina Charlotte Portman, daughter of Viscount Milton married 2nd Viscount Portman June, 1855?) and a blind-stamp 'K' for the case-maker Carl Jacob Kitz of Red Lion Square
British Museum description




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